geek alert! :)

wow. I’m digging the new release of the windows update tool for grabbing patches. it’s got a “shopping cart” type of feel when you select the packages to upgrade and patch. if you have never been to this place and you are running a windows operating system, then shame on you. I know for a fresh install of windows 2000 there’s at least 100+mb of patches and updates to get not including the service packs.

does anyone know what happened to fridayfive.org? eh well, something will pop back in it’s place soon enough. it seems like we all can’t get away from them lovely blog-fillers. 🙂

lately I have been getting deluged with a ton of e-mail spam on my personal account. luckily, since I run the server I use my e-mail on, stopping spam as easy as adding their domain to my mail server’s access files. the problem is where is it all coming from to begin with?

i went through my usual checklist to see which sites I joined (some places sell your e-mail address to lovely spammers) and such, but I haven’t been registering on any sites for quite some time now. only 10 of my personal friends or so know this e-mail address and I removed it from here as well. I was thinking perhaps a spambot was drudging through my site, but I remembered I disguised my e-mail which would hopefully foil that. so what’s left?

ahah!

what if a spambot is drudging through the blogs where I usually comment on? granted I think I have a fairly large list of daily reads up above, I actually comment on about 3 times more sites than those mentioned above (yeah… I’m bored @ work sometimes). while going through them, I noticed there are some blogs out there that makes commenters’ e-mail addresses available as opposed to a web site link like some other bloggers choose to do. there’s also some tag boards and guest books as well that will publish participant’s e-mail addresses too. I was chatting with ada today about this and she made a comment about how movable type includes a spam-buster within it’s code. you simply turn on a “spam_protect” (search for this term in that address above) attribute to a specific tag and it converts the @ symbol to it’s ascii equivalent. granted it’s a good step in the right direction, what’s to say a spambot won’t just convert the ascii back to the “@” form? eh well… this is fast becoming a techie pet peeve of mine. so folks, if you happen to read this and you own a blog with commenting, guest book or tagboard functionality, check out the code. you may be doing your readers a disservice by leaving their e-mail addresses out there for evil spammers to get a hold of. 🙁

while I am at it, my biggest techie pet peeve are people that do not check their web coding for bugs.

nah, I don’t mean the lovely creepy crawlies that you happen to find on your wall, shoes or undies if you like sleeping around (*ewwwwww*). I mean the bits of web code that cause errors to appear when you load up your page. unfortunately, it occurs on more sites than you want it to. so how come I can see it and you don’t, you might be asking?

easy!

by default internet explorer turns off what is called “script debugging” and becomes much more “lenient” by loading the page if an error exists. to turn it back on, you follow these steps:

  • under the Tools menu of IE select Internet Options
  • click on the Advanced tab up on top
  • uncheck Disable script debugging
  • check Display a Notification about every script error
  • click Apply
  • click OK

now keep it on for a couple of weeks and keep a track of the amount of times you get that nice big ol’ error window. annoying right?

the good thing is that the debugging tool is quite helpful in showing you what is wrong so that it can be fixed. it will even tell you what line number the error falls near to make debugging that much quicker! even better download the microsoft script debugger to really get into the code to see where the error is occurring. 😀

roughly 98% of the time I receive an error, I usually get an Unterminated String Constant type which means someone forgot to end their code with a semi-colon. if you can’t find it, bribe your friendly neighborhood coding guru to check out your source code and show you the error of your ways. make absolute sure you give them lots of candy/treats/kisses when they fix your problem and sing their praises. otherwise they may not be so inclined to help you out in the future. 😉

if you happen to stumble onto a site where you find such errors, kindly send that person a short e-mail with the error you are receiving. almost always that person is very grateful for the feedback. sometimes we may miss one nasty bug and a gentle nudge in the right direction makes everyone happier in the end right? 🙂

so would anyone else care to share some of their pc-related pet peeves? 😀

this weekend I may be heading down to good ol’ philly with al to imbibe and shoot some pool @ dave and busters. now I gotta look for my damn power card… say hi if you’re in the area. 😉 chances are you’ll be seeing al mopping up the floor with me. 😆

3 replies on “geek alert! :)”

Thanks Dave for that Script Debugging info. I’ve been sitting at work for the longest time trying to figure out how to disable it because those freaking pop up error messages are so annoying. Granted, it’s good when you are checking your own pages and looking for errors in your code but seriously it just gets in the way of your surfing.

I have a pet peeve, people who use WSIWYG editors and they don’t know how to turn off some features so that these programs put font tags around images. What the hell? If the image is going to be embedded without any text around it, there shouldn’t be any font tags anywhere near it!

Have fun at Dave and Busters. I have yet to see that place, maybe one day.

Ooh, I HAVE to add to this baby! Pet peeves, in no particular order:
1) Unterminated String Constant
2) Getting stuck in frames
3) People that do a dominantly white layout and assume that everyone’s windows are white and don’t put in a background color or image.
4) No-right-click scripts and no target=_blank links.
5) Runny images (no brainer, that).
6) Images that no longer line up with the background when the page is maximized.

*catches breath*

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